The Little School

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781573444880
Release Date: 1998-09-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

One of Argentina's 30,000 "disappeared," Alicia Partnoy was abducted from her home by secret police and taken to a concentration camp where she was tortured, and where most of the other prisoners were killed. Her writings were smuggled out of prison and published anonymously in human rights journals. The Little School is Alicia Partnoy's memoir of her disappearance and imprisonment in Argentina in the 1970s. Told in a series of tales that resound in memory like parables, The Little School is proof of the resilience of the human spirit and the healing powers of art. This second edition features a revised introduction by the author and a preface by Julia Alvarez.

The Little School

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher: Cleis Press
ISBN: 9781573440295
Release Date: 1998-09-03
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

With poetry and insight, the author recalls her life in a concentration camp as one of Argentina's 30,000 "disappeared"

The Little School

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher:
ISBN: 1573440299
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Told in a series of tales that resound in memory like parables, Alicia Partnoy's memoir of disappearance in Argentina is proof of the resilience of the human spirit and the healing powers of art.

Tapestries of Life

Author: Bettina Aptheker
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 0870236598
Release Date: 1989
Genre: Social Science

Uses selections from stories, oral histories, and poems to depict the daily life of contemporary women, and covers work, racism, poverty, lesbians, and spirituality

Human Rights in Latin America

Author: Sonia Cardenas
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812201543
Release Date: 2012-06-29
Genre: Political Science

For the last half century, Latin America has been plagued by civil wars, dictatorships, torture, legacies of colonialism and racism, and other evils. The region has also experienced dramatic—if uneven—human rights improvements. The accounts of how Latin America's people have dealt with the persistent threats to their fundamental rights offer lessons for people around the world. Human Rights in Latin America: A Politics of Terror and Hope is the first textbook to provide a comprehensive introduction to the human rights issues facing an area that constitutes more than half of the Western Hemisphere. Leading human rights researcher and educator Sonia Cardenas brings together regional examples of both terror and hope, emphasizing the dualities inherent in human rights struggles. Organized by three pivotal topics—human rights violations, reform, and accountability—this book offers an authoritative synthesis of research on human rights on the continent. From historical accounts of abuse to successful transnational campaigns and legal battles, Human Rights in Latin America explores the tensions underlying a vast range of human rights initiatives. In addition to surveying the roles of the United States, relatives of the disappeared, and truth commissions, Cardenas covers newer ground in addressing the colonial and ideological underpinnings of human rights abuses, emerging campaigns for disability and sexuality rights, and regional dynamics relating to the International Criminal Court. Engagingly written and fully illustrated, Human Rights in Latin America creates an important niche among human rights and Latin American textbooks. Ample supplementary resources—including discussion questions, interdisciplinary reading lists, filmographies, online resources, internship opportunities, and instructor assignments—make this an especially valuable text for use in human rights courses.

Flowering Fires Fuegos Florales

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher: Settlement House Books
ISBN: 0985946849
Release Date: 2015-12-15
Genre: American poetry

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Women's Studies. Translated from the Spanish by Gail Wronsky. Alicia Partnoy's FLOWERING FIRES/FUEGOS FLORALES is a work of wisdom born of witness and tempered by a lifetime of commitment to her craft. Gail Wronsky's translations render these poems as vital in English as they are in Spanish. This is a book to be cherished, read and reread. The book was honored as the recipient of the first annual Settlement House American Poetry Prize, which acknowledges the importance of the immigrant legacy and its potential as a force for social justice, tolerance and goodwill in the United States. Initiated in 2014, the Prize includes publication by Settlement House of a collection of poems by a first-generation American.

A Lexicon of Terror

Author: Marguerite Feitlowitz
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199753261
Release Date: 2011-01-01
Genre: Political Science

Tanks roaring over farmlands, pregnant women tortured, 30,000 individuals "disappeared"--these were the horrors of Argentina's Dirty War. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year and Finalist for the L.L. Winship / PEN New England Award in 1998, A Lexicon of Terror is a sensitive and unflinching account of the sadism, paranoia, and deception the military junta unleashed on the Argentine people from 1976 to 1983. This updated edition features a new epilogue that chronicles major political, legal, and social developments in Argentina since the book's initial publication. It also continues the stories of the individuals involved in the Dirty War, including the torturers, kidnappers and murderers formerly granted immunity under now dissolved amnesty laws. Additionally, Feitlowitz discusses investigations launched in the intervening years that have indicated that the network of torture centers, concentration camps, and other operations responsible for the "desaparecidas" was more widespread than previously thought. A Lexicon of Terror vividly evokes this shocking era and tells of the long-lasting effects it has left on the Argentine culture.

Sex in Revolution

Author: Mary Kay Vaughan
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822388449
Release Date: 2006-12-27
Genre: Social Science

Sex in Revolution challenges the prevailing narratives of the Mexican Revolution and postrevolutionary state formation by placing women at center stage. Bringing to bear decades of feminist scholarship and cultural approaches to Mexican history, the essays in this book demonstrate how women seized opportunities created by modernization efforts and revolutionary upheaval to challenge conventions of sexuality, work, family life, religious practices, and civil rights. Concentrating on episodes and phenomena that occurred between 1915 and 1950, the contributors deftly render experiences ranging from those of a transgendered Zapatista soldier to upright damas católicas and Mexico City’s chicas modernas pilloried by the press and male students. Women refashioned their lives by seeking relief from bad marriages through divorce courts and preparing for new employment opportunities through vocational education. Activists ranging from Catholics to Communists mobilized for political and social rights. Although forced to compromise in the face of fierce opposition, these women made an indelible imprint on postrevolutionary society. These essays illuminate emerging practices of femininity and masculinity, stressing the formation of subjectivity through civil-society mobilizations, spectatorship and entertainment, and locales such as workplaces, schools, churches, and homes. The volume’s epilogue examines how second-wave feminism catalyzed this revolutionary legacy, sparking widespread, more radically egalitarian rural women’s organizing in the wake of late-twentieth-century democratization campaigns. The conclusion considers the Mexican experience alongside those of other postrevolutionary societies, offering a critical comparative perspective. Contributors. Ann S. Blum, Kristina A. Boylan, Gabriela Cano, María Teresa Fernández Aceves, Heather Fowler-Salamini, Susan Gauss, Temma Kaplan, Carlos Monsiváis, Jocelyn Olcott, Anne Rubenstein, Patience Schell, Stephanie Smith, Lynn Stephen, Julia Tuñón, Mary Kay Vaughan

The Witness

Author: Juan José Saer
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 9781846686917
Release Date: 2009-01
Genre: Fiction

“The evocative imagery and ideas revealed in The Witness are not easily forgotten.”—Washington Times “Haunting and beautifully written.”—Independent on Sunday In sixteenth-century Spain, a cabin boy sets sail on a ship bound for the New World. An inland expedition ends in disaster when the group is attacked by Indians. The Witness explores the relationship between existence and description, foreignness and cultural identity. Juan José Saer was born in Argentina in 1937 and is considered one of Argentina's leading writers of the post-Borges generation. He died in 2005.

How the Crayons Saved the Rainbow

Author: Monica Sweeney
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 9781510705852
Release Date: 2016-05-03
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

The Sun and the Clouds are best friends. Together they keep the world warm, the gardens growing, and the sky full of beautiful rainbows. But one day they get into a fight and refuse to be in the sky together. And that means there are no longer any rainbows. Without rainbows, the colors start disappearing until Earth was left with no color … except for one little forgotten box of crayons in one little school desk. Determined to save the rainbows and fix the Sun and Clouds’ friendship, the crayons draw rainbows all over town. Their attempts go unnoticed. Soon they realize that they’re going to have to do something big to get the attention of the former friends. So, the crayons create the biggest rainbow they can and hope it’s enough to bring color back to the world. How the Crayons Saved the Rainbow teaches the importance of teamwork and perseverance through seven crayons with unique personalities and their desire to see the world in color. Sky Pony Press, with our Good Books, Racehorse and Arcade imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of books for young readers—picture books for small children, chapter books, books for middle grade readers, and novels for young adults. Our list includes bestsellers for children who love to play Minecraft; stories told with LEGO bricks; books that teach lessons about tolerance, patience, and the environment, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

A Disappearance in Damascus

Author: Deborah Campbell
Publisher: Picador
ISBN: 9781250147899
Release Date: 2017-09-05
Genre: History

Winner of the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction Winner of the Freedom to Read Award Winner of the Hubert Evans Prize In the midst of an unfolding international crisis, renowned journalist Deborah Campbell finds herself swept up in the mysterious disappearance of Ahlam, her guide and friend. Campbell’s frank, personal account of a journey through fear and the triumph of friendship and courage is as riveting as it is illuminating. The story begins in 2007, when Deborah Campbell travels undercover to Damascus to report on the exodus of Iraqis into Syria, following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein. There she meets and hires Ahlam, a refugee working as a “fixer”—providing Western media with trustworthy information and contacts to help get the news out. Ahlam has fled her home in Iraq after being kidnapped while running a humanitarian center. She supports her husband and two children while working to set up a makeshift school for displaced girls. Strong and charismatic, she has become an unofficial leader of the refugee community. Campbell is inspired by Ahlam’s determination to create something good amid so much suffering, and the two women become close friends. But one morning, Ahlam is seized from her home in front of Campbell’s eyes. Haunted by the prospect that their work together has led to her friend’s arrest, Campbell spends the months that follow desperately trying to find Ahlam—all the while fearing she could be next. The compelling story of two women caught up in the shadowy politics behind today’s most searing conflict, A Disappearance in Damascus reminds us of the courage of those who risk their lives to bring us the world’s news.

Here s to You Jesusa

Author: Elena Poniatowska
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 0142001228
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Fiction

A sensitive account of the life of Jesusa Palancares de Aguilar follows the young woman from her childhood, through her role in the Mexican Revolution and difficult marriage, to her post-revolutionary criminal career, in a richly textured historical novel that offers an intriguing study of the most important events in Mexican history during the twentieth century. Reprint.

Rosa Lee

Author: Leon Dash
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780465055869
Release Date: 2015-06-02
Genre: Social Science

Based on a heart-rending and much discussed series in the Washington Post, this is the story of one woman and her family living in the projects in Washington, D.C. A transcendent piece of writing, it won the Pulitzer Prize and the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award.For four years Leon Dash of the Washington Post followed the lives of Rosa Lee Cunningham, her children, and five of her grandchildren, in an effort to understand the persistence of poverty and pathology within America’s black underclass. Rosa Lee’s life story spans a half century of hardship in the slums and housing projects of Southeast Washington, a stone’s throw from the marble halls and civic monuments of the world’s most prosperous nation. Yet for all of America’s efforts, Rosa Lee and millions like her remain trapped in a cycle of poverty characterized by illiteracy, teenage pregnancy, drugs, and violent crime.Dash brings us into her life and the lives of her family members offering a human drama that statistics can only refer to. He also shows how some people—including two of Rosa Lee’s children—have made it out of the ghetto, breaking the cycle to lead stable middle-class lives in the mainstream of American society.

438 Days

Author: Jonathan Franklin
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781501116315
Release Date: 2015-11-17
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

“The best survival book in a decade” (Outside magazine), 438 Days is the true story of the fisherman who survived fourteen months in a small boat drifting seven thousand miles across the Pacific Ocean. On November 17, 2012, a pair of fishermen left the coast of Mexico for a weekend fishing trip in the open Pacific. That night, a violent storm ambushed them as they were fishing eighty miles offshore. As gale force winds and ten-foot waves pummeled their small, open boat from all sides and nearly capsized them, captain Salvador Alvarenga and his crewmate cut away a two-mile-long fishing line and began a desperate dash through crashing waves as they sought the safety of port. Fourteen months later, on January 30, 2014, Alvarenga, now a hairy, wild-bearded and half-mad castaway, washed ashore on a nearly deserted island on the far side of the Pacific. He could barely speak and was unable to walk. He claimed to have drifted from Mexico, a journey of some seven thousand miles. 438 Days is the first-ever account of one of the most amazing survival stories in modern times. Based on dozens of hours of exclusive interviews with Alvarenga, his colleagues, search-and-rescue officials, the remote islanders who found him, and the medical team that saved his life, 438 Days is an unforgettable study of the resilience, will, ingenuity and determination required for one man to survive more than a year lost and adrift at sea.