The Doctrine of Judicial Review

Author: Edward S. Corwin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351483490
Release Date: 2017-07-05
Genre: Law

This book, first published in 1914, contains five historical essays. Three of them are on the concept of judicial review, which is defined as the power of a court to review and invalidate unlawful acts by the legislative and executive branches of government. One chapter addresses the historical controversy over states' rights. Another concerns the Pelatiah Webster Myth?the notion that the US Constitution was the work of a single person.In "Marbury v. Madison and the Doctrine of Judicial Review," Edward S. Corwin analyzes the legal source of the power of the Supreme Court to review acts of Congress. "We, the People" examines the rights of states in relation to secession and nullification. "The Pelatiah Webster Myth" demolishes Hannis Taylor's thesis that Webster was the "secret" author of the constitution. "The Dred Scott Decision" considers Chief Justice Taney's argument concerning Scott's title to citizenship under the Constitution. "Some Possibilities in the Way of Treaty-Making" discusses how the US Constitution relates to international treaties.Matthew J. Franck's new introduction to this centennial edition situates Corwin's career in the history of judicial review both as a concept and as a political reality.

The Constitutional Foundations of Judicial Review

Author: Mark Elliott
Publisher: Hart Publishing
ISBN: 9781841131801
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Law

Recent years have witnessed a vibrant debate concerning the constitutional basis of judicial review, which reflects a broader discourse about the role of the courts, and their relationship with the other institutions of government, within the constitutional order. This book comprehensively analyzes the foundations of judicial review. It subjects the traditional justification, based on the doctrine of ultra vires, to critical scrutiny and fundamental reformulation, and it addresses the theoretical challenges posed by the impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 on administrative law and by the extension of judicial review to prerogative and non-statutory powers. It also explores the relationship between the theoretical basis of administrative law and its practical capacity to safeguard individuals against maladministration. The book seeks to develop a constitutional rationale for judicial review which founds its legitimacy in core principles such as the rule of law, the separation of powers and the sovereignty of Parliament. It presents a detailed analysis of the interface between constitutional and administrative law, and will be of interest to all public lawyers.

Marbury V Madison

Author: William Edward Nelson
ISBN: 0700610618
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Law

We take for granted today the tremendous power of the Supreme Court to interpret our laws and overrule any found in conflict with the Constitution. Yet our nation was a quarter-century old before that power of "judicial review" was fully articulated by the Court itself in Marbury v. Madison (1803). William Nelson's concise study of that landmark case provides an insightful and readable guide for students and general readers alike. Book jacket.

Judicial Review and the Constitution

Author: Christopher Forsyth
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781847311870
Release Date: 2000-05-01
Genre: Law

This collection of essays presents opposing sides of the debate over the foundations of judicial review. In this work,however, the discussion of whether the 'ultra vires' doctrine is best characterised as a central principle of administrative law or as a harmless, justificatory fiction is located in the highly topical and political context of constitutional change. The thorough jurisprudential analysis of the relative merits of models of 'legislative intention' and 'judicial creativity' provides a sound base for consideration of the constitutional problems arising out of legislative devolution and the Human Rights Act 1998. As the historical orthodoxy is challenged by growing institutional independence, leading figures in the field offer competing perspectives on the future of judicial review. "Confucius was wrong to say that it is a curse to live in interesting times. We are witnessing the development of a constitutional philosophy which recognises fundamental values and gives them effect in the mediation of law to the people??. (Sir John Laws) Contributors Nick Bamforth, Paul Craig, David Dyzenhaus, Mark Elliott, David Feldman, Christopher Forsyth, Brigid Hadfield, Jeffrey Jowell QC, Sir John Laws, Dawn Oliver, Sir Stephen Sedley, Mark Walters. With short responses by: TRS Allan, Stephen Bailey, Robert Carnworth, Martin Loughlin, Michael Taggart, Sir William Wade.

Judicial Dictatorship

Author: William J. Quirk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351510424
Release Date: 2017-07-05
Genre: Social Science

American society has undergone a revolution within a revolution. Until the 1960s, America was a liberal country in the traditional sense of legislative and executive checks and balances. Since then, the Supreme Court has taken on the role of the protector of individual rights against the will of the majority by creating, in a series of decisions, new rights for criminal defendants, atheists, homosexuals, illegal aliens, and others. Repeatedly, on a variety of cases, the Court has overturned the actions of local police or state laws under which local officials are acting. The result, according to Quirk and Birdwell, is freedom for the lawless and oppression for the law abiding. 'Judicial Dictatorship' challenges the status quo, arguing that in many respects the Supreme Court has assumed authority far beyond the original intent of the Founding Fathers. In order to avoid abuse of power, the three branches of the American government were designed to operate under a system of checks and balances. However, this balance has been upset. The Supreme Court has become the ultimate arbiter in the legal system through exercise of the doctrine of judicial review, which allows the court to invalidate any state or federal law it considers inconsistent with the constitution. Supporters of judicial review believe that there has to be a final arbiter of constitutional interpretation, and the Judiciary is the most suitable choice. Opponents, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln among them, believed that judicial review assumes the judicial branch is above the other branches, a result the Constitution did not intend. The democratic paradox is that the majority in America agreed to limit its own power. Jefferson believed that the will of the majority must always prevail. His faith in the common man led him to advocate a weak national government, one that derived its power from the people. Alexander Hamilton, often Jefferson's adversary, lacking such faith, feared "the amazing violence an

A Distinct Judicial Power

Author: Scott Douglas Gerber
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199780969
Release Date: 2011-01-10
Genre: Law

A Distinct Judicial Power: The Origins of an Independent Judiciary, 1606-1787, by Scott Douglas Gerber, provides the first comprehensive critical analysis of the origins of judicial independence in the United States. Part I examines the political theory of an independent judiciary. Gerber begins chapter 1 by tracing the intellectual origins of a distinct judicial power from Aristotle's theory of a mixed constitution to John Adams's modifications of Montesquieu. Chapter 2 describes the debates during the framing and ratification of the federal Constitution regarding the independence of the federal judiciary. Part II, the bulk of the book, chronicles how each of the original thirteen states and their colonial antecedents treated their respective judiciaries. This portion, presented in thirteen separate chapters, brings together a wealth of information (charters, instructions, statutes, etc.) about the judicial power between 1606 and 1787, and sometimes beyond. Part III, the concluding segment, explores the influence the colonial and early state experiences had on the federal model that followed and on the nature of the regime itself. It explains how the political theory of an independent judiciary examined in Part I, and the various experiences of the original thirteen states and their colonial antecedents chronicled in Part II, culminated in Article III of the U.S. Constitution. It also explains how the principle of judicial independence embodied by Article III made the doctrine of judicial review possible, and committed that doctrine to the protection of individual rights.

Courts and Federalism

Author: Gerald Baier
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 9780774841023
Release Date: 2011-11-01
Genre: Law

Courts and Federalism examines recent developments in the judicial review of federalism in the United States, Australia, and Canada. Through detailed surveys of these three countries, Gerald Baier clearly demonstrates that understanding judicial doctrine is key to understanding judicial power in a federation. Baier offers overwhelming evidence of doctrine's formative role in division-of-power disputes and its positive contribution to the operation of a federal system. Courts and Federalism urges political scientists to take courts and judicial reasoning more seriously in their accounts of federal government.

Judicial Review and the Law of the Constitution

Author: Sylvia Snowiss
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300046650
Release Date: 1990-01-01
Genre: Law

In this book, the author presents a new interpretation of the origin of judicial review. She traces the development of judicial review from American independence through the tenure of John Marshall as Chief Justice, showing that Marshall's role was far more innovative and decisive than has yet been recognized. According to the author all support for judicial review before Marshall contemplated a fundamentally different practice from that which we know today. Marshall did not simply reinforce or extend ideas already accepted but, in superficially minor and disguised ways, effected a radical transformation in the nature of the constitution and the judicial relationship to it.

Judicial Review Handbook

Author: Michael Fordham
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781782250296
Release Date: 2012-10-31
Genre: Law

Writing in the fifth edition of this Handbook, author Michael Fordham described his ambition when writing the first edition (and indeed all subsequent editions) of this book as "to read as many judicial review cases as I could and to try to extract, classify and present illustrations and statements of principle". Behind this aim lay the practitioner's overwhelming need to know and understand the case-law. Without it, as Fordham says "much can be achieved in public law through instinct, experience and familiarity with general principles which are broad, flexible and designed to accord with common sense". But with knowledge of the case law comes the vital ability to be able to point to and rely on an authoritative statement of principle and working illustration. Knowing the case-law is crucial: "the challenge is to find it". This, the sixth edition of the Handbook, continues the tradition established by earlier editions, in rendering the voluminous case-law accessible and knowable. This Handbook remains an indispensable source of reference and a guide to the case-law in judicial review. Established as an essential part of the library of any practitioner engaged in public law cases, the Judicial Review Handbook offers unrivalled coverage of administrative law, including, but not confined to, the work of the Administrative Court and its procedures. Once again completely revised and up-dated, the sixth edition approximates to a restatement of the law of judicial review, organised around 63 legal principles, each supported by a comprehensive presentation of the sources and an unequalled selection of reported case quotations. It also includes essential procedural rules, forms and guidance issued by the Administrative Court. As in the previous edition, both the Civil Procedure Rules and Human Rights Act 1998 feature prominently as major influences on the shaping of the case-law. Their impact, and the plethora of cases which explore their meaning and application, were fully analysed and evaluated in the previous edition, but this time around their importance has grown exponentially and is reflected in even greater attention being given to their respective roles. Attention is also given to another new development - the coming into existence of the Supreme Court. Here Michael Fordham casts an experienced eye over the Court's work in the area of judicial review, and assesses the early signs from a Court that is expected to be one of the key influences in the development of judicial review in the modern era. The author, a leading member of the English public law bar, has been involved in many of the leading judicial review cases in recent years and is the founding editor of the Judicial Review journal. " institution for those who practise public has the authority that comes from being compiled by an author of singular distinction". (Lord Woolf, from the Foreword to the Fifth Edition)

New Directions in Judicial Review

Author: Jeffrey L. Jowell
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0420478000
Release Date: 1988
Genre: Contrôle juridictionnel de l'administration - Grande-Bretagne

This collection of essays selects five issues which pose urgent challenges to administrative law: public/private law distinction, extension of the range of authorities that are subject to judicial review, the evolving doctrine about the protection of legitimate expectations, the principle of proportionality as a ground for review, & the increasing judicial supervision of the policy-making process.

A Guide to Judicial and Political Review of Federal Agencies

Author: John Fitzgerald Duffy
Publisher: American Bar Association
ISBN: 1590314832
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Administrative agencies

"This book provides a thorough overview of the law of judicial and political control of federal agencies. The primary focus is on the availability and scope of judicial review, but the book also discusses the control exercised by the U.S. president and Congress"--Provided by publisher.