Cultivating Food Justice

Author: Alison Hope Alkon
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262016261
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Science

Popularized by such best-selling authors as Michael Pollan, Barbara Kingsolver, and Eric Schlosser, a growing food movement urges us to support sustainable agriculture by eating fresh food produced on local family farms. But many low-income neighborhoods and communities of color have been systematically deprived of access to healthy and sustainable food. These communities have been actively prevented from producing their own food and often live in "food deserts" where fast food is more common than fresh food. Cultivating Food Justice describes their efforts to envision and create environmentally sustainable and socially just alternatives to the food system. Bringing together insights from studies of environmental justice, sustainable agriculture, critical race theory, and food studies, Cultivating Food Justice highlights the ways race and class inequalities permeate the food system, from production to distribution to consumption. The studies offered in the book explore a range of important issues, including agricultural and land use policies that systematically disadvantage Native American, African American, Latino/a, and Asian American farmers and farmworkers; access problems in both urban and rural areas; efforts to create sustainable local food systems in low-income communities of color; and future directions for the food justice movement. These diverse accounts of the relationships among food, environmentalism, justice, race, and identity will help guide efforts to achieve a just and sustainable agriculture.

Food Systems and Health

Author: Sara Shostak
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 9781787148901
Release Date: 2017-08-22
Genre: Medical

Volume 18 of Advances in Medical Sociology brings cutting-edge sociological research to bear on these multiple dimensions of food systems and their impacts on individual and population health. This volume highlights how food systems matter for health policy, health politics, the lived experiences and life chances of individuals and communities.

The Intersection of Food and Public Health

Author: A. Bryce Hoflund
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9781351649131
Release Date: 2017-09-13
Genre: Medical

Presently, ideas about food are in flux from a variety of sources. Examples of this evolution include recognizing the importance of food on health by public health and medical professionals; changing consumer desires around the production methods and components of their food; a greater focus on injustices within the national food system; evolving knowledge of how the food system impacts the environment; and, shifting economic and technological realities that underpin where and how food is produced, distributed and sold. ? These shifting ideas about food exist in contrast to the narrative of the highly functioning, industrialized, global food system that emerged in the second half of the 20th century. This edited volume fills a void by presenting a comprehensive and engaging coverage of the key issues at the intersection of public health, policy, and food. The Intersection of Food and Public Health is comprised of research that examines current problems in food studies and how various stakeholders are attempting to address problems in unique ways. ? The book will be of interest to undergraduate and graduate students in a variety of disciplines, including public administration, public policy, public health, economics, political science, nutrition, dietetics, and food studies.

Latinos and Latinas at Risk Issues in Education Health Community and Justice 2 volumes

Author: Gabriel Gutiérrez
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313399268
Release Date: 2015-01-26
Genre: Social Science

This two-volume collection of essays addresses the Latino/a experience in present-day America, covering six major areas of importance: education, health, family, children, teens, and violence. • Provides information from authoritative sources and data based on recent research • Includes ancillary tables, figures, and statistics for visual support • Features thoughtful questions and reflections on the chapters that support readers' further exploration of the topics • Shares some first-hand accounts and autobiographies along with selected interviews

The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics

Author: Mary Rawlinson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317595502
Release Date: 2016-07-01
Genre: Philosophy

While the history of philosophy has traditionally given scant attention to food and the ethics of eating, in the last few decades the subject of food ethics has emerged as a major topic, encompassing a wide array of issues, including labor justice, public health, social inequity, animal rights and environmental ethics. This handbook provides a much needed philosophical analysis of the ethical implications of the need to eat and the role that food plays in social, cultural and political life. Unlike other books on the topic, this text integrates traditional approaches to the subject with cutting edge research in order to set a new agenda for philosophical discussions of food ethics. The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject and is the first collection of its kind. Comprising over 35 chapters by a team of international contributors, the Handbook is divided into 7 parts: the phenomenology of food gender and food food and cultural diversity liberty, choice and food policy food and the environment farming and eating other animals food justice Essential reading for students and researchers in food ethics, it is also an invaluable resource for those in related disciplines such as environmental ethics and bioethics.

California Cuisine and Just Food

Author: Sally K. Fairfax
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262304931
Release Date: 2012-10-05
Genre: Technology & Engineering

Can a celebrity chef find common ground with an urban community organizer? Can a maker of organic cheese and a farm worker share an agenda for improving America's food? In the San Francisco Bay area, unexpected alliances signal the widening concerns of diverse alternative food proponents. What began as niche preoccupations with parks, the environment, food aesthetics, and taste has become a broader and more integrated effort to achieve food democracy: agricultural sustainability, access for all to good food, fairness for workers and producers, and public health. This book maps that evolution in northern California. The authors show that progress toward food democracy in the Bay area has been significant: innovators have built on familiar yet quite radical understandings of regional cuisine to generate new, broadly shared expectations about food quality, and activists have targeted the problems that the conventional food system creates. But, they caution despite the Bay Area's favorable climate, progressive politics, and food culture many challenges remain.

Food Trucks Cultural Identity and Social Justice

Author: Julian Agyeman
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262534079
Release Date: 2017-09
Genre: Social Science

The food truck on the corner could be a brightly painted old-style lonchera offering tacos or an upscale mobile vendor serving lobster rolls. Customers range from gastro-tourists to construction workers, all eager for food that is delicious, authentic, and relatively inexpensive. Although some cities that host food trucks encourage their proliferation, others throw up regulatory roadblocks. This book examines the food truck phenomenon in North American cities from Los Angeles to Montreal, taking a novel perspective: social justice. It considers the motivating factors behind a city's promotion or restriction of mobile food vending, and how these motivations might connect to or impede broad goals of social justice. The contributors investigate the discriminatory implementation of rules, with gentrified hipsters often receiving preferential treatment over traditional immigrants; food trucks as part of community economic development; and food trucks' role in cultural identity formation. They describe, among other things, mobile food vending in Portland, Oregon, where relaxed permitting encourages street food; the criminalization of food trucks by Los Angeles and New York City health codes; food as cultural currency in Montreal; social and spatial bifurcation of food trucks in Chicago and Durham, North Carolina; and food trucks as a part of Vancouver, Canada's, self-branding as the "Greenest City." ContributorsJulian Agyeman, Sean Basinski, Jennifer Clark, Ana Croegaert, Kathleen Dunn, Renia Ehrenfeucht, Emma French, Matthew Gebhardt, Phoebe Godfrey, Amy Hanser, Robert Lemon, Nina Martin, Caitlin Matthews, Nathan McClintock, Alfonso Morales, Alan Nash, Katherine Alexandra Newman, Lenore Lauri Newman, Alex Novie, Matthew Shapiro, Hannah Sobel, Mark Vallianatos, Ginette Wessel, Edward Whittall, Mackenzie Wood

Routledge Handbook of Food and Nutrition Security

Author: Bill Pritchard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317596240
Release Date: 2016-03-31
Genre: Social Science

The concept of food and nutrition security has evolved and risen to the top of the international policy agenda over the last decade. Yet it is a complex and multi-faceted issue, requiring a broad and inter-disciplinary perspective for full understanding. This Handbook represents the most comprehensive compilation of our current knowledge of food and nutrition security from a global perspective. It is organized to reflect the wide scope of the contents, its four sections corresponding to the accepted current definitional frameworks prevailing in the work of multilateral agencies and mainstream scholarship. The first section addresses the struggles and progression of ideas and debates about the subject in recent years. The other sections focus on three key themes: how food has been, is and should be made available, including by improvements in agricultural productivity; the ways in which politico-economic and social arenas have shaped access to food; and the effects of food and nutrition systems in addressing human health, known as food utilisation. Overall, the volume synthesizes a vast field of information drawn from agriculture, soil science, climatology, economics, sociology, human and physical geography, the nutrition and health sciences, environmental science and development studies.

Organic Struggle

Author: Brian K. Obach
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262029094
Release Date: 2015-05-15
Genre: Science

An analysis of the successes and failures of the organic movement, focusing on coalition dynamics, movement-state relations, and market-based strategies for social change.

Seeds Science and Struggle

Author: Abby J. Kinchy
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262517744
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Science

An examination of how advocates for alternative agriculture confront "science-based" regulation of genetically engineered crops.

Japan s Dietary Transition and Its Impacts

Author: Vaclav Smil
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262017824
Release Date: 2012
Genre: History

In a little more than a century, the Japanese diet has undergone a dramatic transformation. This book points out that the gains in the quality of Japans diet have exacted a price in terms of land use changes, water requirements, & marine resource depletion; & because Japan imports so much food, this price is paid globally as well as domestically.

Geographies of Race and Food

Author: Rachel Slocum
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317129066
Release Date: 2016-04-15
Genre: Social Science

While interest in the relations of power and identity in food explodes, a hesitancy remains about calling these racial. What difference does race make in the fields where food is grown, the places it is sold and the manner in which it is eaten? How do we understand farming and provisioning, tasting and picking, eating and being eaten, hunger and gardening better by paying attention to race? This collection argues there is an unacknowledged racial dimension to the production and consumption of food under globalization. Building on case studies from across the world, it advances the conceptualization of race by emphasizing embodiment, circulation and materiality, while adding to food advocacy an antiracist perspective it often lacks. Within the three socio-physical spatialities of food - fields, bodies and markets - the collection reveals how race and food are intricately linked. An international and multidisciplinary team of scholars complements each other to shed light on how human groups become entrenched in myriad hierarchies through food, at scales from the dining room and market stall to the slave trade and empire. Following foodways as they constitute racial formations in often surprising ways, the chapters achieve a novel approach to the process of race as one that cannot be reduced to biology, culture or capitalism.

Ecojustice Adult Education Theory and Practice in the Cultivation of the Cultural Commons

Author: Audrey M. Dentith
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781119383406
Release Date: 2017-04-17
Genre: Education

As ecological issues increase and concern worldwide is mounting about the changing nature of work and cultural life, the field of adult education must respond. Adult education holds much potential for its ability to highlight cultural knowledge, promote change, and maximize the capacity of adults to work together in strengthening mutually supportive communities that contribute to a sustainable future. It is imperative that we (re)educate adults about productive but sustainable work and stronger local community living within an understanding of the relational being and the interdependency of all things. This edited collection explores the cultural roots of the ecological/cultural crisis and its relationship to adult education. The development of sound practices and new cultural understandings among adults are emphasized. Certainly, there exists evidence of small grassroots work that builds hope and skills for the coming of a new age of sustainable and just life. This volume discusses the: Connections between sustainability, environmental and ecojustice education, Forms of radical sustainability adult education, Established cultural institutions as potential agents of change, Principles of ecojustice education, and Implementation of these principles in formal and community education settings. This is the 153rd volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums.