When Affirmative Action Was White An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth Century America

Author: Ira Katznelson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393347142
Release Date: 2006-08-17
Genre: History

A groundbreaking work that exposes the twisted origins of affirmative action. In this "penetrating new analysis" (New York Times Book Review) Ira Katznelson fundamentally recasts our understanding of twentieth-century American history and demonstrates that all the key programs passed during the New Deal and Fair Deal era of the 1930s and 1940s were created in a deeply discriminatory manner. Through mechanisms designed by Southern Democrats that specifically excluded maids and farm workers, the gap between blacks and whites actually widened despite postwar prosperity. In the words of noted historian Eric Foner, "Katznelson's incisive book should change the terms of debate about affirmative action, and about the last seventy years of American history."

Affirmative Action

Author: Francis Beckwith
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015040574744
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Philosophy

Contains fifteen essays on affirmative action

The Affirmative Action Debate

Author: George E. Curry
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: STANFORD:36105011858409
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Political Science

Politicians, executives, lawyers, and social researchers discuss affirmative action policies, their benefits and problems, and alternative solutions to discrimination

Affirmative Action

Author: Tim J. Wise
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781136078422
Release Date: 2012-11-12
Genre: Education

Affirmative Action examines the larger structure of institutional white privilege in education, and compares the magnitude of white racial preference with the policies typically envisioned when the term "racial preference" is used. In doing so, the book demonstrates that the American system of education is both a reflection of and a contributor to a structure of institutionalized racism and racial preference for the dominant majority.

Affirmative Action Around the World

Author: Thomas Sowell
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300107757
Release Date: 2005-03
Genre: Political Science

An eminent authority presents a new perspective on affirmative action in a provocative book that will stir fresh debate about this vitally important issue

For Discrimination

Author: Randall Kennedy
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307907387
Release Date: 2013-09-03
Genre: Social Science

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s recent decision regarding Fisher v. University of Texas, For Discrimination is at once the definitive reckoning with one of America’s most explosively contentious and divisive issues and a principled work of advocacy for clearly defined justice. What precisely is affirmative action, and why is it fiercely championed by some and just as fiercely denounced by others? Does it signify a boon or a stigma? Or is it simply reverse discrimination? What are its benefits and costs to American society? What are the exact indicia determining who should or should not be accorded affirmative action? When should affirmative action end, if it must? Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School professor and author of such critically acclaimed and provocative books as Race, Crime, and the Law and the national best-seller Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word, gives us a concise, gimlet-eyed, and deeply personal conspectus of the policy, refusing to shy away from the myriad complexities of an issue that continues to bedevil American race relations. With pellucid reasoning, Kennedy accounts for the slipperiness of the term “affirmative action” as it has been appropriated by ideologues of every stripe; delves into the complex and surprising legal history of the policy; coolly analyzes key arguments pro and con advanced by the left and right, including the so-called color-blind, race-neutral challenge; critiques the impact of Supreme Court decisions on higher education; and ponders the future of affirmative action.

Mismatch

Author: Richard Sander
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780465030019
Release Date: 2012-10-09
Genre: Law

Affirmative action in higher education started in the late 1960s as a noble effort to jump-start racial integration in American society and create the conditions for genuine equal opportunity. Forty years later, it has evolved into a swampland of posturing, concealment, pork-barrel set-asides, and--worst of all--a preferences system so blind to its own shortcomings that it ends up hurting the very minorities educators set out to help. Over the past several years, economist, law professor and civil rights activist Richard Sander has led a national consortium of more than two dozen nonpartisan scholars to study the operation and effects of preferences in higher education. In Mismatch, he and journalist Stuart Taylor present a rich and data-driven picture of the way affirmative action works (and doesn't work) in this setting. Though their liberal leanings would indicate support for race-based policies, Sander and Taylor argue that the research shows that affirmative action does not in fact help minorities. Racial preferences in higher education put a great many students in educational settings where they have no hope of competing--a phenomenon that they call "mismatch." American law schools provide a particularly vivid illustration of how "mismatch" harms the educations and careers of many minority students. Compelling evidence shows that racial preferences double the rate at which black students fail bar exams and may well in the end reduce, rather than increase, the aggregate number of black lawyers. Moreover, because preferences are targeted at upper-middle class minorities, they help shut low-income students of all races out of much of higher education. If you're black and poor--or white and poor, for that matter--your chances of stepping into the halls of some of the nation's most elite institutions are no greater than they were in the 1960s. Unfortunately, the academic establishment is only committed to symbolic change, and it will undermine any research that contests its reflexive political correctness and challenges its sacred cows. Sander and Taylor argue that university leaders and much of America's elite have become so deeply committed to an ideology of racial preferences, and so distrustful of broader American public opinion on these issues, that they have widely embraced regimes that ignore the law, hide data, and put out systematic misinformation on their own racial policies. Sander and Taylor conclude by looking at data on how to level the racial playing field in higher education. Existing studies, they argue, suggest that early childhood interventions are much more likely to produce success down the line.

Affirmative Action

Author: M.J. Cosson
Publisher: ABDO Publishing Company
ISBN: 9781617852558
Release Date: 2010-09-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Discusses the controversial viewpoints regarding affirmative action.

In Defense of Affirmative Action

Author: Barbara R. Bergmann
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0465098347
Release Date: 1997-02-27
Genre: Business & Economics

Argues that American society will never be free of prejudice without affirmative action programs to reduce discrimination against women and minorities in the workplace

Affirmative action

Author: Leora Maltz
Publisher: Greenhaven Pr
ISBN: STANFORD:36105123593217
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Business & Economics

Essays cover a variety of viewpoints on the subject of using educational admissions practices to achieve equal opportunity for all members of a society affected by discrimination.

Understanding the Backlash Against Affirmative Action

Author: John Fobanjong
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 159033065X
Release Date: 2001-01-01
Genre: Business & Economics

Affirmative action remains one of the most divisive issues in America, remaining unsolved since the 1960s civil rights legislation. Though many works have attempted to solve the dilemma, none have tried to identify the underlying causes of the backlash against the policy. In order to understand affirmative action's future, one must understand its evolution, its opposition, and its application both in America and in other nations. In a multi-disciplinary approach, this book examines affirmative action from comparative, historical, policy, and sociological perspectives. Also included is a list of Supreme Court rulings on affirmative action.

Psychological Perspective on Affirmative Action

Author: Dennis Doverspike
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 159454722X
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Psychology

What does psychology have to do with affirmative action? In the author's opinion, questioning the relevance of psychology to an issue such as affirmative action is, unfortunately, not an uncommon query, even among many people within the field of psychology. When most people, both within and outside the field, make an association between psychology and affirmative action, it is in terms of the debate over racial differences in performance on intelligence tests. Thus, the decision to write this book was based upon what was seen as a need to demonstrate and highlight the substantive contribution that psychology can make in terms of improving our understanding of why it is that people respond to affirmative action with a variety of reactions and emotions. The primary goal of this book is to discuss empirical research and theoretical work on affirmative action from a psychological perspective. The intended audience is academics, including undergraduate and graduate students, and social science researchers.